orange, lilac and green

Thanks to everyone who visited last weekend”s Open Studios. Those who came towards the end of day two may have found me a bit incoherent as I’m not accustomed to so much talking. It was all good fun, though, and I was delighted to see so many kids (of all ages!) having a go at weaving on a table loom. One wee girl in particular really took to the loom. I showed her a 1/3 twill first, so she just had to lift one shaft at a time, then she overheard me telling her older brother about lifting two shafts at a time and she worked out the 2/2 twill progression all by herself!

In loom news: I was able to finish weaving with the lilac weft and had a nice fat wodge of cloth on the loom.

keeping track of yardage

(In case you were wondering, the white threads are marking off metres.) However, I decided to cut it off…

cut off

blue-pink yardage

…and re-tie before starting to weave the last stretch of the warp in green.

blue-pink with green weft

And the really good news of the week: we have our new washing machine! I was able to wash the yardage yesterday, and have a lot of pressing ahead.

orange, lilac and green” was posted by Cally on 26 October 2013 at http://callybooker.co.uk

Creative Commons License

6 Responses

  1. Kate
    | Reply

    Cally, it’s beautiful
    Thank you for your patience last week, I love your studio and can’t wait until Jan!

  2. Michelle
    | Reply

    Cally, Cally, Cally, Cally – just who are you kidding that you are not used to talking? Beautiful fabric btw!
    xxxxx

    • Cally
      | Reply

      Well there’s talking to weavers and then there is coherent talking to non-weavers. I count these as two completely different disciplines!

  3. Karen
    | Reply

    Hurrah for the washing machine!
    And, another for this cloth – it is beautiful, and shiny!

  4. Meg
    | Reply

    Wodge. A new word. Long warps are wonderful. Except when I get bored of them. 🙂

  5. neki rivera
    | Reply

    all that glow and sparkle!
    keep the work with young weavers so that weaving doesn’t die(note the spelling) 😉

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